Publicly-backed Private Finance

Gino Brunswijck

Annual Meetings round-up: As uncertainty reigns in the global economy, there are strong calls for a rethink of Fund and Bank policies

With the country still reeling from the devastation of the Sulawesi tsunami, Indonesia played host to the Annual Meetings of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank Group (WBG), in Bali last week. The sobriety of the moment was reflected in gloomy forecasts from the IMF, which issued stark warnings of debt and trade risks to global growth. Meanwhile, controversy surrounded the World Bank’s new Human Capital Index; the 2019 World Development Report; and the ‘private finance first’ approach at the core of the Bank’s Maximising Finance for Development. CSOs and academics raised their voices to shine a light on the risks that the policies of the Bretton Woods Institutions (BWIs) posed to human rights and sustainable development across the Global South. Eurodad presented new research on the harmful impacts of Public-Private Partnerships and on IMF loan conditionality, and facilitated dialogue on better creditor coordination to solve debt crises.

  • Publicly-backed Private Finance
Julia Ravenscroft

Report exposes how PPPs across the world drain the public purse, and fail to deliver in the public interest

A new report exposes how public private partnerships across the globe have drained the public purse and failed to deliver in the public interest.

  • Publicly-backed Private Finance
Maria Jose Romero

History RePPPeated - How public-private partnerships are failing

Public-Private Partnerships are increasingly being promoted as the solution to the shortfall in financing needed to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. This report gives an in-depth, evidence-based analysis of the impact of ten PPP projects across four continents, in both the global south and the global north.

  • Publicly-backed Private Finance
Gino Brunswijck

Argentina: 20 años después, ¿realmente han cambiado los métodos del FMI?

This is a Spanish version of the article: Argentina: 20 years on, has the IMF really changed its ways? It has been initially published at FARN website.

En julio, los argentinos experimentaron un déjà vu con los anuncios del gobierno de despidos masivos y congelamiento de salarios como parte de las medidas de ajuste ligadas a un préstamo del Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI). Miles de funcionarios públicos se ven obligados una vez más a asumir duras medidas de austeridad. De acuerdo con el programa del FMI se introducirán medidas selectivas de asistencia social para compensar la situación.

  • Publicly-backed Private Finance
Julia Ravenscroft

C20 Argentina: The G20 plan to create an infrastructure ‘asset class’ must be shelved, and replaced with a plan to increase and improve public investment in infrastructure

Eurodad report shows the G20’s plan to develop an ‘infrastructure asset class’ to encourage private investment in developing countries is fundamentally flawed and must be shelved.

  • Publicly-backed Private Finance
Julia Ravenscroft

C20 Argentina: El plan del G20 para convertir la infraestructura en una ‘clase de activo’ debe ser archivado y reemplazado por un plan para aumentar y mejorar la inversión pública en infraestructura

Un informe de Eurodad concluye que el plan del G20 de desarrollar una ‘clase de activo a partir de la infraestructura’ para alentar la inversión privada en los países en desarrollo es un gran error y debe ser archivado.

  • Publicly-backed Private Finance
Jesse Griffiths

Three compelling reasons why the G20’s plan for an infrastructure asset class is fundamentally flawed

Few doubt the need for significant global investment in sustainable infrastructure. Without better social and economic infrastructure, such as hospitals, schools, railways and sanitation, the prospect of achieving the Sustainable Development Goals looks increasingly remote.

  • Publicly-backed Private Finance
Jesse Griffiths

G20 game over? Three reasons why the Finance Ministers’ meeting shows the G20’s time may be up

The G20 Finance Ministers of the world’s largest economies met in Buenos Aires last weekend, but their failure to tackle pressing global problems, including the threat of trade wars and a looming debt crisis, highlighted how ineffective the G20 has become.  Given that the G20 cannot tackle key issues, is promoting ineffective initiatives, and has largely become a rubber stamping body for other actors, the time is ripe to rethink how the global economy is governed, and to promote alternatives.

  • Debt Justice
Gino Brunswijck

Argentina: 20 years on, has the IMF really changed its ways?

This article has also been published by Triple Crisis. 

Argentinians are experiencing deja-vu this month as the government announces massive layoffs and a hiring freeze as part of an adjustment package attached to a loan from the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Thousands of public servants are being forced yet again to swallow the bitter pill of austerity, which the IMF programme - published last Friday - aims to patch up through increased targeted social assistance.

  • Publicly-backed Private Finance
Maria Jose Romero

Civil Society Organisations’ open letter to World Bank on PPPs

Last October, more than 150 organisations signed a PPP Global Campaign Manifesto, expressing our alarm at the increasing use of PPPs to deliver infrastructure projects and public services around the world, and in particular the World Bank’s role in promoting these contracts. Our combined evidence shows that the experience of PPPs has been negative, and few PPPs have delivered results in the public interest. Our concerns are echoed by many more organisations and individuals across the world, who are alarmed by the risk that this represents for developing countries.

  • Publicly-backed Private Finance
  • Global Processes